FINAL REVIEW SCHEDULE

Thursday, May 22

9:30—Frances Thomas (Gales) (two speakers)

10:10—Ella Morton (SPG) (one speaker + plinth)

10:50—Ian Macchiusi (GCFA 130) (two speakers – bring from SPG)

11:30—Jennifer MacDonald (GCFA 130) (two speakers)

12:10—Scott Harber (GCFA 130) (projector + speakers)

BREAK

1:30—Frances Miller (SPG) (Two pairs of speakers)

2:10—Claire Dykhuis (GCFA 130)

2:50—Sasha Sobrino (GCFA 130)

3:30—Jorge Lozano (ACW 103) (HD projector / SD projector / speakers)

4:10—Marina Nabil Fathalla (GCFA 130) (projector & speakers)

Friday, May 23

9:30—Emmie Tsumura (various spaces)

10:10—Zoë Heyn-Jones (GCFA 130) (speakers)

10:50—Jacob McLean (GCFA 130)

11:30—Alejandro Tamayo (GCFA 130)

12:10—Colleen Wolstenholme (GCFA 130) (speakers + projector)

BREAK

1:30—Anna Sarchami (GCFA 326—lighting room)

2:10—Amy Wong (Gales) (3 speakers + screen?)

2:50—Christine Chiou (Gales) (2 speakers + projector)

3:30—Sara Marino (GCFA 130)

4:10—Erin Howley (GCFA 130)

 

Properties & Audiography

Four properties

1. SPATIAL IMMERSION – sound immersive / proximal in contrast to visual subject/object separation (Duchamp: “one can look at seeing; one can’t hear hearing”)

Max Neuhaus – Times Square (1980—present)

La Monte Young & Marian Zazeela—Dream House (ongoing)

La Monte Young’s Eternal Music (March 16, 1972) (radio special)

Brandon Labelle—Michael Asher and the Subject of Space

Alvin Lucier—Vespers (1969)

Alvin Lucier—I Am Sitting in a Room (original version) (1969)

Francis Ford Coppola—The Conversation (1973)

2. TEMPORAL FLUX -” Sounds support an ontology of events” (Cox)

Sonic process is compatible with an ontology not rooted in transcendental entities, but in immanent flux: for Karen Barad, relations precede relata; for philosopher of technics Gilbert Simondon, individuation happens through the appropriation of elements of a pre-individual fund which are then modulated and spun back out into the flux.

Elizabeth Grosz on Bergsonian Temporalities (Ch. 7 of The Nick of Time)

John Cage—Imaginary Landscape IV (1951)

Scanner—Scanner (s/t CD) (cell phone conversation appropriation) (1993)

Allan Kaprow—18 Happenings in Six Parts (1959)

Christoph Cox—Installing Duration: Time in the Sound Works of Max Neuhaus (includes a section critiquing Michael Fried’s Art and Objecthood)

Alvin Lucier—Music on a Long Thin Wire (1978) (excerpt)

Steve Reich—It’s Gonna Rain (1966)

3. SCHIZOPHONIA / CHRONOPORTATION (via technology / phono-graphy (sound+writing)

recording = medium for transformation / transmutation (ALCHEMY)

schizophonia: sound separated from the space/time of its production

chronoportation: time-travel

Luigi Russolo—compilation of early noise works

Orson Welles & Mercury Theater—The War of the Worlds (1938)

William S. Burroughs—Origin and Theory of the Tape Cut-Ups

William S. Burroughs—Silver Smoke of Dreams (1960s); MUCH more on ubuweb

Edison’s 10 uses for the phonograph

Pierre Schaeffer—5 Études de Bruits (1948)

Arthur Lipsett—Very Nice, Very Nice (1961)

Erik Satie—musique d’ameublement (furniture music) (1920) more here

John Cage—Empty Words (Parte III) (Milan, 1977); entire recording here

4. RELATIONAL 

Serres: “Being-in-the-world never before heard the world. (FEEDBACK within FLUX)”

Also beyond the purely audible, involving also a transindividual vibrational continuum (Goodman).

Max Neuhaus—Public Supply (1966)

Electronic Voice Phenomena—The Ghost Orchid (CD compilation)

Christina Kubisch—Wellenfang (Wave Catcher) (excerpt)

Christina Kubisch—La ville magnétique

Dan Graham—Performer/Audience/Mirror (1975) (excerpt) and here

RESONANCES for FUTURE INVESTIGATION

Sound and the In/Non-Human

Bernie Krause—The Habitat Niche Hypothesis: A Hidden Symphony of Animal Sounds

Bernie Krause—The Niche Hypothesis

Jakob von Üexkull—A Foray into the Worlds of Animals and Humans

Jussi Parikka—Insect Media (2010)

David Dunn—Mappings and Entrainments (1984)

Donna Haraway—When Species Meet

Donna Haraway—A Companion Species Manifesto

Late Capitalist Temporalities

Brian Massumi—Perception Attack (2008)

Steven Shaviro—Post-Cinematic Affect (2010)

Jacques Attali—Noise: A Political Economy of Music (1977)

Franco (Bifo) Berardi—Time, Acceleration and Violence (2011)

Elena Esposito—The Future of Futures: The Time of Money in Financing and Society

Jonathan Crary—24/7: Late Capitalism and the Ends of Sleep (2013)

George Kubler—The Shape of Time (1962)

Accelerationism / Becoming Inhuman

Nick Land—Circuitries (1992) / Meltdown (1994) / Machinic Desire (1993)

Amy Ireland—Noise: An Ontology of the Avant-Garde (VIDEO) (2013)

Bernard Stiegler—Memory (from Critical Terms for Media Studies) (2010)

Sigmund Freud—Beyond the Pleasure Principle (1920)

Brian Massumi—The Autonomy of Affect (1995)

Steven Shaviro—Accelerationist Aesthetics (2013)

Benjamin Bratton—Some Trace Effects of the Post-Anthropocene (2013)

Michel Serres—The Natural Contract

Between Representation and Realism

Karen Barad—Posthumanist Performativity: Toward an Understanding of How Matter Comes To Matter (2003)

Rick Dolphijn & Iris van der Tuin—New Materialism: Interviews and Cartographies

Earworms & Aural Pathologies

Steve Goodman—The Earworm (Ch. 27 from Sonic Warfare) (2010) Notes.

Marc Couroux—Xenochronic Dispatches from the Domain of the Phonoegregore (and VIDEO) (2013)

eldritch Priest—A Plague on Both Your Ears (2013)

Oliver Sacks—Musicophilia: Tales of Music and the Brain

Douglas Kahn—Two Sounds of the Virus (from Noise Water Meat) (1999)

Expanded Perception & Listening

David Cecchetto—Four aural-neiric speculations with a very fat head (2013)

Elie During—Loose Coexistence: Technologies of Attention (2010)

Anahid Kassabian—Ubiquitous Listening (2001)

Robert Sumrell & Kalis Varnelis—The Stimulus Progression: Muzak (2007)

David Goodman—Distracted Listening: On Not Making Sound Choices in the 1930s (Ch. 1 from Sound in the Age of Mechanical Reproduction, eds. Suisman & Strasser)

Mark Bain—Psychosonics and the Modulation of Public Space

Mètis, Disposition & Cunning Intelligence

Keller Easterling—Disposition (2010)

François Jullien—Treatise on Efficacy (1996)

Matthew Fuller & Andrew Goffey—Toward an Evil Media Studies (2009)

Benedict Singleton—(Notes Towards) Speculative Design (2012)

Marcel Détienne & Jean-Pierre Vernant—Cunning Intelligence in Greek Culture and Society (1974)

Michel Serres—The Parasite (1980)

James C. Scott—Domination and the Arts of Resistance (1990)

Robert Chia & Robin Holt—Strategy Without Design (2010)

Arthur Schopenhauer—The Art of Always Being Right (also here)

Nandita Biswas Mellamphy—Ghost in the Shell-Game: On the Mètic Mode of Existence, Inception and Innocence (2013)

Marc Couroux—Preemptive Glossary for a TechnoSonic Control Society (2013)

Hyperstition

eldritch Priest—To Make a Better Crease (2013) (on the Occulture)

Irit Rogoff—Productive Anticipation (2008)

William S. Burroughs—The Invisible Generation

Delphi Carstens—Hyperstition

Elie Ayache—In the Middle of the Event (2010)

Isabelle Stengers & Philippe Pignarre—Capitalist Sorcery

Nigel Thrift—Pass It On: Towards a Political Economy of Propensity (2008)

Comedy

Alenka Zupancic—Structural Dynamics and the Temporality of the Comical (from The Odd One In)

Sound and the Occult

Marcel Duchamp—The Creative Act (1957)

Carl Michael von Hausswolff—1485.0 kHz (2000) (on the work of Friedrich Jürgenson and Electronic Voice Phenomena)

POST 5 over 4: questions

1. What kinds of listening modes can be enacted that refuse a self-silencing / self-disciplining? (A first step towards this might be the identification of listening modes that we already undertake unbeknownst to ourselves, within a capitalist, technologically-advanced context). (Eg. Can one learn to listen peripherally?)

2. Sound has been a noisy presence within visual art contexts (cf. Fluxus, Pivato performance) but is constantly running the risk of domestication (headphones, soundproofed isolation, narrowly targeted speakers (LRAD variety)). What are the stakes in continuing to insist on sound’s capacity to intervene politically within art institutions? How might the evolving nature of such institutions warrant new forms of sonic intervention? Or put a different way: how might one OCCUPY a space via sound?

3. How does the game of attention-grabbing function today, in a world of dense sensory stimulation? (How can a culture of interruptions be interrupted?) What are some of the new ways in which signals cut through noise? Can distraction—considered a negative condition—have positive aspects?

4. Have you ever been in a situation where the notion of frequency (pitch) seemed allied with a political position? What about volume? (Sounds warranting dispersal vs. magnetically attractive sounds?)

5. What types of cognitive and affective manipulation are specific to sound? How does sound manage to insinuate itself into consciousness and unconsciousness?

Constellations and Properties

Three constellations

1. What are the constitutive properties of sound—the modalities by which it operates effectively—that significantly challenge the historical preponderance of visuality?

2. How might sound and its perpetual becoming and fluxional change—its intrinisic temporality—function as a model for intuiting alternate political dispositions? Here we mean political both in terms of organizational and informational structures as well as and perhaps more importantly in terms of abstract philosophical models.

3. How can sound accelerate an expansion of art practice beyond the realm of the palpable, both sensorially and temporally, given the massive world objects, ungraspable processes of climate change, globalization, networked communication, deterritorialized financial capitalism, the anthropocene and the anthroposonic? How might sound productively accost the non-human, the inhuman, and affective, transpersonal, preconsious forces?

We can’t talk about sound’s potential and what it can do concretely within any of these domains without attending to its constitutive properties, through a materialist approach which accounts for bandwidths both accessible and inaccessible to perception.

Four properties

1. SPATIAL IMMERSION – sound immersive / proximal in contrast to visual subject/object separation (Duchamp: “one can look at seeing; one can’t hear hearing”)

Max Neuhaus – Times Square

2. TEMPORAL FLUX -” Sounds support an ontology of events” (Cox)

Sonic process is compatible with an ontology not rooted in transcendental entities, but in immanent flux: for Karen Barad, relations precede relata; for philosopher of technics Gilbert Simondon, individuation happens through the appropriation of elements of a pre-individual fund which are then modulated and spun back out into the flux.

John Cage – Imaginary Landscape IV

3. SCHIZOPHONIA / CHRONOPORTATION (via technology / phono-graphy (sound+writing)

recording = medium for transformation / transmutation (ALCHEMY)

schizophonia: sound separated from the space/time of its production

chronoportation: time-travel

4. RELATIONAL 

Serres: “Being-in-the-world never before heard the world. (FEEDBACK within FLUX)”

Also beyond the purely audible, involving also a transindividual vibrational continuum (Goodman).